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angelak
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5 hours ago, angelak said:

Sandi--I love that you love the Toby Daye series. It is pretty awesome! I would be curious to discuss with the series with you as well. Granted, my MA thesis was on Adolescent Literature and Transmedia Narratives--and I didn't do much with gender roles/theory, I think it is safe to say that we both love to learn! 

In fact, I think with this abundance of extra time that I find myself with, I'm going to go back and re-read the Toby Daye books again!

If you can afford it, or if you are an Audible member (good prices sometimes), or if your library has it, I highly highly recommend the audiobooks. All of them are now on audiobooks, great narrator, and it is wonderful to have someone read to you!

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On 3/23/2020 at 4:02 PM, Sandi Wiseheart said:

Dear Twinkie J: 

I have indeed read the Fear Nothing and Seize the Night books, and I adore them. I had them on cassette and listened to them so many times I wore out one tape. I now have the digital audiobooks and love those. The narrator (same as for cassette version) is excellent and convey’s Koontz’s wacky humour perfectly! The narrator has a Polish name, unpronounceable unless you have Polish DNA. First name is Keith, first two letters of last name are “Sb”. It is fascinating to listen to him say his own last name.

I think I slightly prefer the audiobooks, because Someone Reading Me A Story is the best. If you haven’t tried those, try ‘em. 

I wish to heaven Koontz would write the third book before we all die. (Supposedly there’s a partial manuscript in a safe somewhere.)

dinner time!

hugs to you and all my Twinkies!

 

 

 

Edited by Juanita
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On 3/23/2020 at 4:02 PM, Sandi Wiseheart said:

Dear Twinkie J: 

I have indeed read the Fear Nothing and Seize the Night books, and I adore them. I had them on cassette and listened to them so many times I wore out one tape. I now have the digital audiobooks and love those. The narrator (same as for cassette version) is excellent and convey’s Koontz’s wacky humour perfectly! The narrator has a Polish name, unpronounceable unless you have Polish DNA. First name is Keith, first two letters of last name are “Sb”. It is fascinating to listen to him say his own last name.

I think I slightly prefer the audiobooks, because Someone Reading Me A Story is the best. If you haven’t tried those, try ‘em. 

I wish to heaven Koontz would write the third book before we all die. (Supposedly there’s a partial manuscript in a safe somewhere.)

dinner time!

hugs to you and all my Twinkies!

 

 

I wish he would write the third book too!! I did listen to both in audio book format and you are right, the narrator is wonderful!

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On 3/22/2020 at 4:02 PM, angelak said:

Hi Liliy! *waves!* 

I was wondering if you read any of Seamus McGuire's October Daye series. It is urban fantasy with some chick lit thrown in. The first book is Rosemary and Rue and there are thirteen or fourteen in the series so far. I love listening to them, but they are a great read as well.  (Just a recommendation!)

I'm currently reading The Bookish Life of Nina Hill  and I know that Kim has read it recently too--I'm looking forward to hearing thoughts on the book and how the second book is going as well. 

Hi @angelak *waving back* 😃

I haven't read the October Daye series, never even heard of it but I just popped over and ordered it from the library (not that the library is open right now). Thanks for the suggestion!

I'm about halfway through The Garden of Small Beginnings. I'm enjoying it although I don't like the main character as much as I liked Nina Hill. but I REALLY liked Nina Hill. I do enjoy the children in Abbi Waxman's books though, they are always interesting. 

On 3/23/2020 at 9:18 AM, Kim Werker said:

Ooh, @Lilly.O.4 you have some good ones on there. Stolen Things is a super page-turner (though not not-stressful!), and The Body in Question is one of my favourite books I read in 2019.  Good to know @Kim Werker, "moving those higher in the stack" 

Gracefully Grayson is a must-read for all of society. YES! ABSOLUTELY! 100% 

 

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On 3/24/2020 at 6:21 PM, Juanita said:

I wish he would write the third book too!! I did listen to both in audio book format and you are right, the narrator is wonderful!

Me, too. I have been waiting for Book 3 ever since Book 2 was published. I bought the books first. Then I bought the audio cassettes! Then the CDs. And now the digital versions. That’s how much I love those books. 

I did hear Koontz speak once (yes, I am that much of a Koontz fan) and he said that he didn’t want to do book 3 until he knew he could do justice to Christopher Snow & Co. He did say he had an idea that there might not be a #3, which made everyone booo. 

Every time I re-listen I mentally send him all sorts of good plot ideas. Or at least, I think they don’t suck. 

I know there is fan-fic out there, but I have never been one to read fan-fic for some reason. Probably the terrible writing of some of it, and the outrageous plots (“Snow would NEVER do that!”). 

I LOVE THE ANIMAL TALKING GUY. I love all the dogs and cats in general who show up to help at important plot points. Plus, I love the voice of the Dog that Keith SBJ does in the audio versions. “Squirrel. Squirrel. Lots of squirrels. Squirrels chasing squirrels. Squirrels having squirrel sex. Squirrel pee! That’s the best smell, squirrel pee!”

BEST.

 

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I tried reading Fire and Blood, George R. R. Martin's history of the Targaryens, but abandoned it after 50 pages because it was written as a history should be, and that's not what I want from my fiction. (I've been trying to figure out the best number of pages to give a book before giving up on it. I read somewhere - probably in Austin Kleon's blog - that librarian and expert reader's advisor Nancy Pearl says 50 pages of your 50 or younger, otherwise subtract your age from 100 and use that number.) Every once in a while something cool would happen, but no dialogue or internal monologue killed it for me.

I was thinking that maybe I should find some dystopian books where the good guys win, but instead decided to get back to hopepunk. So now I'm reading Alexandra Rowland's A Conspiracy of Truths and loving it. Rowland coined the term hopepunk, but I'm not sure if Rowland's own books are hopepunk.

 

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16 hours ago, Sandi Wiseheart said:

 

I know there is fan-fic out there, but I have never been one to read fan-fic for some reason. Probably the terrible writing of some of it, and the outrageous plots (“Snow would NEVER do that!”). 

The trick is to find an Archive of Our Own user with similar tastes to yours, and go down the rabbit hole of their bookmarks.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/23/2020 at 3:55 PM, Sandi Wiseheart said:

Shannon Mayer’s Rylee Adamson series, both books and related short stories and novellas: Some people say this is “just like” the Toby Daye books. They are wrong. (Opinions? Who, me?) If you want my reasons see below.

—————bottom of the page comment———————-

Both the Rylee books and the Toby books are very similar, in that both have protagonists who are youngish women with strange personal stories; both books have humour woven throughout, although the Rylee humour is a bit less sophisticated, shall I say, relying sometimes on physical gag type-stuff while Toby’s humour is dry, wry, and sarcastic, just the way I like it; both involve the supernatural, faeries and trolls and so on; both are a series of adventure/mystery stories told with Rylee or Toby as the Sheroes, solving the problems for everyone. Both have their surrounding cast of weird and amusing friends and allies.  Just from a literary standpoint, the Toby Daye books are vastly superior: Maguire has done a TON of research, and does an amazing job of stitching her faeries and whatnot into the larger patchwork of worldwide myths and stories; Toby and her various supporting characters are deeper, better drawn overall, more complex; the writing is Just Plain Better on the Toby side of things; and the Toby books are actually book-length, each and every one. The Rylee books are sometimes shorter than average books. Even side characters have depth in Toby’s world; the stories themselves are much more complex in Maguire’s work. And I could go on with the literary stuff, but I won’t.

Sandi--I am giving it a shot. Mayer has a couple of different ways to read the series'. Check out her website and let me know which you recommend.

Also, I love the Kate Daniels and Harry Dresden serieses. I like the Sookie Stackhouse series and the current one she is writing about Gunny. Did you get into Patricia Griggs at all? I keep trying to get into Moon Called. Also--I enjoyed Mercedes Lackey's 500 Kingdoms retellings of fairy tales but I kinda struggle with her other stuff.

 

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I'm waiting for The Giver of Stars from the library (going to be a long wait), good know that it will be worth it. I finished The Garden of Small Beginnings, it was good. I didn't like it as much as The Bookish Life of Nina Hill but it's definitely worth reading. I also flew through Stolen Things by R.H.  Herron, @Kim Werker was right, it's a real page-turner. I've now started on Trail of Broken Wings by Sejal Badani and I'm finding it slow going. I'm not sure if it's because Stolen Things was so fast-paced or if it's the writing style, maybe both. It's a good story though so I'll keep going.

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I forced myself back into reading by whipping through a Penny Reid romance series (or part of one, at least) last week, and have finally given myself permission to read The Starless Sea, by Erin Morgenstern, which I anticipate will be magnificent so I've been putting it off for "a good time" – which is never and always.

@Lilly.O.4 So glad you enjoyed Stolen Things!

Edited by Kim Werker
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16 hours ago, Kim Werker said:

I forced myself back into reading by whipping through a Penny Reid romance series (or part of one, at least) last week

Was it the reading material or reading in general that you had the issues with? I am a firm believer that life is too short for bad books!

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On 4/11/2020 at 11:57 PM, angelak said:

Sandi--I am giving it a shot. Mayer has a couple of different ways to read the series'. Check out her website and let me know which you recommend.

I say just read the central book series in order:

  • Rosemary and Rue
  • A Local Habitation
  • An Artificial Night
  • Late Eclipses
  • One Salt Sea
  • Ashes of Honor
  • Chimes at Midnight
  • The Winter Long
  • A Red-Rose Chain
  • Once Broken Faith
  • The Brightest Fell
  • Night and Silence
  • The Unkindest Tide 

 

There is a list of short stories and novellas which can be inserted into their proper place, as you say. It took me quite a while to track down some of the bits not in books; a couple of them exploded my Kindle, so I am not sure I want to share those! 

So the main reason I said “read the books” was that it was a lot of trouble to hunt down the shorter works. I would finish a book, try to locate the story, and it would take so long that I would just get frustrated and go on to the next book. That said, it has been a year or two since I last went through everything, so the docs might be out there in a better, easier-to-find, format. 

The books themselves are long and full of amazing detail, so there’s plenty there to keep you going if all you do is read the books. 

I have listened to the Sookie books several times; also some of the Briggs. I have just begun the Harry Dresden series, am on book two. I borrowed it from the library, and there is no such thing as a due date now, so I haven’t focussed enough to finish it. All good books!

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10 minutes ago, Sandi Wiseheart said:

I say just read the central book series in order:

  • Rosemary and Rue
  • A Local Habitation
  • An Artificial Night
  • Late Eclipses
  • One Salt Sea
  • Ashes of Honor
  • Chimes at Midnight
  • The Winter Long
  • A Red-Rose Chain
  • Once Broken Faith
  • The Brightest Fell
  • Night and Silence
  • The Unkindest Tide 

 

There is a list of short stories and novellas which can be inserted into their proper place, as you say. It took me quite a while to track down some of the bits not in books; a couple of them exploded my Kindle, so I am not sure I want to share those! 

So the main reason I said “read the books” was that it was a lot of trouble to hunt down the shorter works. I would finish a book, try to locate the story, and it would take so long that I would just get frustrated and go on to the next book. That said, it has been a year or two since I last went through everything, so the docs might be out there in a better, easier-to-find, format. 

The books themselves are long and full of amazing detail, so there’s plenty there to keep you going if all you do is read the books. 

I have listened to the Sookie books several times; also some of the Briggs. I have just begun the Harry Dresden series, am on book two. I borrowed it from the library, and there is no such thing as a due date now, so I haven’t focussed enough to finish it. All good books!

I misspoke. I have all of the Toby Daye series. I was talking about the series by Shannon Mayer!

 

I do LOVE Toby Daye so I hope this is something I might be able to enjoy!

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12 hours ago, angelak said:

I am a firm believer that life is too short for bad books!

I'm right there with you on this! It's that I just didn't have the attention span/was too exhausted to sit and read. The romance series was unchallenging and entertaining, and I forced myself to sit with it until I found my reading groove again. 🙂

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@Kim Werker OMG! The Night Circus was amazing. Magical! I feel like I was transported! Also, Jim Dale (reader of the Harry Potter audiobooks) did such an amazing job! I will say that having it read really adds to the storytelling tradition from Widget!

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9 hours ago, angelak said:

@Kim Werker OMG! The Night Circus was amazing. Magical! I feel like I was transported! Also, Jim Dale (reader of the Harry Potter audiobooks) did such an amazing job! I will say that having it read really adds to the storytelling tradition from Widget!

So glad you enjoyed it! The Starless Sea, it turns out, has a great scene with knitting and it made me so happy. ❤️ 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 6 months later...

Kim asked about books for her 10-year old son.  Has he read anything by Lloyd Alexander, Edgar Eager, T.A. Barron (not as wonderful as the others but...)  Dick King Smith (these might seem too young but they are great), the Narnia series?  The Pink Motel by Carrie Ryie Brink.  Let me know if I'm missing the mark!

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